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Warning not to take risks to get ‘beach body ready’

We have warned people considering cosmetic interventions in search of a ‘beach ready’ body to think twice before embarking on what could be risky procedures.

A year after our standards for doctors offering cosmetic interventions came into force – ensuring doctors work safely and putting a stop to high pressure sales techniques and two-for-one deals which encourage consumers to make unwise or hasty decisions – we are urging would-be patients to use caution and common sense.

"Anyone considering having cosmetic work done should give themselves the time to think long and hard before deciding whether to go ahead."

Mary Agnew

Assistant Director, Standards

Pressure to emulate others

Mary Agnew, Assistant Director for Standards, said: ‘It’s the time of year when people are looking forward to summer holidays, and to relaxing on the beach.

‘Unfortunately men and women, young people especially, are often faced with images of perfect 'beach ready' bodies, and sometimes feel under pressure to emulate them.

‘Some people see cosmetic procedures as a shortcut to getting the look they want. But  such interventions should never be undertaken lightly, as they all carry risks.

‘Anyone considering having cosmetic work done should give themselves the time to think long and hard before deciding whether to go ahead.’ 

Guidance for prospective patients

Read our guide for patients, Cosmetic procedures: what do I need to consider?

It includes advice on the sort of questions prospective patients should ask before agreeing to a procedure. 

Ask questions and walk away if you’re unsure

Agnew added: ‘Potential patients should never feel reticent about asking questions and expecting clear and thorough answers. Reputable doctors will be happy to discuss procedures in detail, and to answer any queries people have.

‘We want people to feel empowered to take their time, do their research and to ask questions. Patients have a right to expect a high-level of safe care, and if they’re in any doubt they should walk away.’