Delegation and referral (2013)

  1. 2. In this guidance, we explain how doctors can put these principles into practice when delegating care and making referrals. You are not accountable to the GMC for the actions (or omissions) of those to whom you delegate care or make referrals. You will be accountable for your decisions to transfer care and the steps you have taken to make sure that patient safety is not compromised. Serious or persistent failure to follow this guidance will put your registration at risk.

Delegation

  1. 3. Delegation involves asking a colleague to provide care or treatment on your behalf.
  2. 4. When delegating care you must be satisfied that the person to whom you delegate has the knowledge, skills and experience to provide the relevant care or treatment; or that the person will be adequately supervised.
  3. 5. When you delegate care you are still responsible for the overall management of the patient.

Referral 

  1. 6. Referral is when you arrange for another practitioner to provide a service that falls outside your professional competence.
  2. 7. Usually you will refer to another doctor or healthcare professional registered with a statutory regulatory body.
  3. 8. Where this is not the case, you must be satisfied that systems are in place to assure the safety and quality of care provided – for example, the services have been commissioned through an NHS commissioning process.
  4. 9. The following applies whether you are delegating or referring.
    1. a. You should explain to the patient that you plan to transfer part or all of their care, and explain why.
    2. b. You must pass on to the healthcare professional involved:
  • relevant information about the patient’s condition and history
  • the purpose of transferring care and/or the investigation, care or treatment the patient needs.
  1. c. You must make sure the patient is informed about who is responsible for their overall care and if the transfer is temporary or permanent. You should make sure the patient knows whom to contact if they have questions or concerns about their care.
  2. d. You should check that the patient understands what information you will pass on and why. If the patient objects to a disclosure of information about them that you consider essential to the safe provision of care, you should explain that you cannot refer them or arrange for their treatment without also disclosing that information.

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