What to tell us when you apply guide

FtP question 3: Medical school concerns

This page will help you answer fitness to practise question 3 on your application.

Has a medical school or university raised concerns about your professionalism or behaviour, that led to a formal process?

The formal process could be to support you, or to investigate the concerns. Usually a committee, hearing or similar decides what action to take after the process has finished. 

If you received a verbal warning that didn’t lead to any action or an investigation against you, answer 'no’.

What you need to tell us

We only need to know about concerns that led to a formal process. If someone raised a concern about your professionalism or behaviour, and this led to a formal process it usually means you needed to take action to stay fit to continue your studies.

What do we mean by ‘concerns about your professionalism or behaviour’?

A medical school could raise concerns if anything happens during your medical education or in your private life that falls below their expectations. Some examples of concerns include:

  • bullying or harassing others
  • cheating or copying someone else’s work (plagiarism)
  • continued poor attendance during your studies, training or clinical placements
  • failing to maintain appropriate boundaries with others
  • falsifying signatures on documents
  • inappropriate use of social media.

If the concern raised led to a formal process you need to tell us when you apply.

What do we mean by a ‘formal process’?

A medical school or university could start a formal process to provide support, investigate the concerns or refer to a panel, committee or hearing. Examples can include:

  • formally recorded investigations
  • a referral to a formal panel, committee or hearing (for example a student fitness to practise hearing or conduct committee).

Outcomes of a formal process can include:

  • a formal written warning
  • a written letter setting out a plan to address concerns about your professionalism or behaviour with a structured support plan
  • written notification of the outcome of a panel, committee or hearing.

If someone raised a concern that led to any of the bullet points above, you need to tell us about it when you apply.

What you don't need to tell us

Processes that finished where no action was taken against you

You don’t need to tell us if the process finished and no action was taken against you because the concerns were not substantiated.

Verbal warnings by medical schools

You don’t need to tell us about verbal warnings, even if confirmation was given to you in writing or by email.

What to do if you need to tell us

If your medical school raised concerns about your professionalism or behaviour, answer yes to fitness to practise question 3 on your application and give the following details:

  • detailed information about the issue that led to the concern being raised, including relevant date(s)
  • details of the formal process, who was involved and what the outcome was
  • information about any action taken and the outcome of the formal process
  • contact names and details (address, email and telephone number) of person(s) involved at the medical school or university. We may contact them to gather further information or to verify the information you have provided
  • any other additional information you want us to consider.

I’m still not sure whether I need to tell you about medical school concerns. What should I do?

Use our ‘What to tell us when you apply’ tool to help you decide whether to tell us about concerns raised about your professionalism or behaviour at medical school. If you’ve used the tool and you’re still not sure get in touch with one of our advisers.