Case study 4 – Dr Djenaba

This case study will assist doctors who:

  • have had a break in practice for more than five years
  • can provide supportive references relating to previous employment in a medical capacity
  • are able to provide evidence of completion of recent relevant medical continuing professional development (CPD).

Background

Dr Djenaba graduated from medical school in July 2002. She applied for full registration with a licence to practise in October 2017.

Between September 2002 and September 2012 Dr Djenaba worked in a medical capacity in Cameroon, as a general physician.

She moved to France in October 2012 and worked as a research intern until December 2015. This role was not considered to be medical practice. However during this time she took part in structured CPD.

She came to the UK in December 2015 and began work as a Healthcare Assistant.

As part of her application, Dr Djenaba submitted:

  • a supportive reference relating to her role as a general physician in Cameroon.
  • evidence of sustained and systematic CPD and continuing medical education (CME) completed during the break in practice. The CPD consisted of a broad range of courses. The evidence included verifiable course certificates and attendance records.
  • written confirmation of an offer of employment for a role in Dr Djenaba’s speciality of Haematology at a hospital in Sussex. She also included a copy of the job and person specification, which included the responsibilities and key skills required for the role
  • details of the assessment process for the role, including dates of interviews and testing
  • a certificate of good standing from the Cameroon Medical Council.

What did the decision maker take into account?

The decision maker took into account the criteria and guidance on breaks in practice. In particular:

  • when Dr Djenaba applied for registration with a licence to practise, it had been 15 years and three months since she graduated. She had practised for a total of ten years and therefore met the criteria that a doctor must have practised for 60% of time since graduation
  • but she also had a break in practice of five years before she applied, so she did not meet the criteria of having practised for a minimum of 12 months prior to application
  • the evidence she provided relating to her UK job offer was verified with the employer.

As Dr Djenaba only met one part of the criteria, the decision maker considered whether she had submitted evidence to demonstrate that she had mitigated the break in practice.

  • her evidence, which included a supportive reference covering her practice in Cameroon
  • robust and verifiable evidence that she had been offered a medical post at a UK hospital
  • evidence of CPD which demonstrated that she had attempted to maintain her knowledge and skills throughout the break in practice
  • a certificate of good standing from the Cameroon Medical Council.

What was our decision?

Dr Djenaba only met one of the criteria, but provided evidence to demonstrate that she had attempted to mitigate the break in practice by taking steps to keep her knowledge and skills up to date. Dr Djenaba had done so by completing CPD and had been offered a medical post in a UK hospital.

The decision maker felt that although there was evidence that Dr Djenaba had continued to keep her knowledge and skills up to date, a significant amount of time had passed since she last practised. The CPD and job offer alone were insufficient to satisfy the decision maker that her knowledge and skills were up to date.

The decision maker therefore decided not to grant Dr Djenaba full registration with a licence to practise.