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Theme 2: Educational governance and leadership

Purpose

This theme is about making sure that organisations have effective systems of educational governance and leadership to manage and control the quality of medical education and training.

These systems should treat learners according to principles of safety, equality and fairness. They should ensure appropriate assessment, manage learners’ progression, and share outcomes of education and training programmes. It is in the public and patients’ interests that there is effective, robust, transparent and fair oversight of education and training.

Information should be shared across educational and clinical governance systems to identify risk to patient safety and the quality of education and training, and to ensure transparency and accountability.

Responsibility

All organisations must demonstrate leadership of medical education and training through effective educational governance. Working together, they should integrate educational, clinical and medical governance to keep patients and learners safe and create an appropriate learning environment and organisational culture.

Postgraduate deaneries and LETBs manage the quality and funding of postgraduate training programmes provided by LEPs in their regions.

Medical schools (and the universities of which they are a part) manage and control the quality of education leading to the award of their primary medical qualifications. They make sure LEPs appropriately educate their medical students by providing appropriate placements.

LEPs control the organisational culture and the quality of education and training in their local organisations. An executive must be accountable for educational governance, and those in educational leadership roles must have demonstrable educational credibility and capability.

Colleges, faculties and specialty associations develop and maintain curricula and assessment frameworks according to the standards for curricula and assessment set by the GMC. Colleges, faculties and specialty associations are responsible for the quality of approved curricula and exams. They work in partnership with national bodies, postgraduate deaneries, LETBs and LEPs to select learners to training programmes.

Standards

S2.1 The educational governance system continuously improves the quality and outcomes of education and training by measuring performance against the standards, demonstrating accountability, and responding when standards are not being met.

S2.2 The educational and clinical governance systems are integrated, allowing organisations to address concerns about patient safety, the standard of care, and the standard of education and training.

S2.3 The educational governance system makes sure that education and training is fair and is based on principles of equality and diversity.

Requirements

R2.1 Organisations1 must have effective, transparent and clearly understood educational governance systems and processes to manage or control the quality of medical education and training.

R2.2 Organisations must clearly demonstrate accountability for educational governance in the organisation at board level or equivalent. The governing body must be able to show they are meeting the standards for the quality of medical education and training within their organisation and responding appropriately to concerns.

R2.3 Organisations must consider the impact on learners of policies, systems or processes. They must take account of the views of learners, educators and, where appropriate, patients, the public, and employers. This is particularly important when services are being redesigned.

R2.4 Organisations must regularly evaluate and review the curricula and assessment frameworks, education and training programmes and placements they are responsible for to make sure standards are being met and to improve the quality of education and training.

R2.5 Organisations must evaluate information about learners’ performance, progression and outcomes – such as the results of exams and assessments – by collecting, analysing and using data on quality and on equality and diversity.

R2.6 Medical schools, postgraduate deaneries and LETBs must have agreements with LEPs to provide education and training to meet the standards. They must have systems and processes to monitor the quality of teaching, support, facilities and learning opportunities on placements, and must respond when standards are not being met.

R2.7 Organisations must have a system for raising concerns about education and training within the organisation. They must investigate and respond when such concerns are raised, and this must involve feedback to the individuals who raised the concerns.

R2.8 Organisations must share and report information about quality management and quality control of education and training with other bodies that have educational governance responsibilities. This is to identify risk, improve quality locally and more widely, and to identify good practice.

R2.9 Organisations must collect, manage and share all necessary data and reports to meet GMC approval requirements.

R2.10 Organisations responsible for managing and providing education and training must monitor how educational resources are allocated and used, including ensuring time in trainers’ job plans.

R2.11 Organisations must have systems and processes to make sure learners have appropriate supervision. Educational and clinical governance must be integrated so that learners do not pose a safety risk, and education and training takes place in a safe environment and culture.

R2.12 Organisations must have systems to manage learners’ progression, with input from a range of people, to inform decisions about their progression.

R2.13 Medical schools must have one or more doctors at the school who oversee medical students’ educational progression. They must have one or more doctors at each LEP who coordinate training of medical students, supervise their activities, and make sure these activities are of educational value.

R2.14 Organisations must make sure that each doctor in training has access to a named clinical supervisor who oversees the doctor’s clinical work throughout a placement. The clinical supervisor leads on reviewing the doctor’s clinical or medical practice throughout a placement, and contributes to the educational supervisor’s report on whether the doctor should progress to the next stage of their training.

R2.15 Organisations must make sure that each doctor in training has access to a named educational supervisor who is responsible for the overall supervision and management of a doctor’s educational progress during a placement or a series of placements. The educational supervisor regularly meets with the doctor in training to help plan their training, review progress and achieve agreed learning outcomes. The educational supervisor is responsible for the educational agreement, and for bringing together all relevant evidence to form a summative judgement about progression at the end of the placement or a series of placements.

R2.16 Organisations must have systems and processes to identify, support and manage learners when there are concerns about a learner’s professionalism, progress, performance, health or conduct that may affect a learner’s wellbeing or patient safety.

R2.17 Organisations must have a process for sharing information between all relevant organisations whenever they identify safety, wellbeing or fitness to practise concerns about a learner, particularly when a learner is progressing to the next stage of training.

R2.18 Medical schools (and the universities of which they are a part) must have a process to make sure that only those medical students who are fit to practise as doctors are permitted to graduate with a primary medical qualification. Medical students who do not meet the outcomes for graduates or who are not fit to practise must not be allowed to graduate with a medical degree or continue on a medical programme. Universities must make sure that their regulations allow compliance by medical schools with GMC requirements with respect to primary medical qualifications. Medical schools must investigate and take action when there are concerns about the fitness to practise of medical students, in line with GMC guidance. Doctors in training who do not satisfactorily complete a programme for provisionally registered doctors must not be signed off to apply for full registration with the GMC.

R2.19 Organisations must have systems to make sure that education and training comply with all relevant legislation.

R2.20 Organisations must make sure that recruitment, selection and appointment of learners and educators are open, fair and transparent.

 

1 Organisations that are responsible for educational governance.