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New regulations introducing a time limit on provisional registration

Web News

11 Dec 2014

We’re making an important change to the way doctors can use their provisional registration.

From 1 April 2015, the length of time doctors will be allowed to hold provisional registration will be limited to a maximum of three years and 30 days (1125 days in total). After this their provisional registration will expire.

What this change means

Putting a time limit on provisional registration will make sure doctors can’t hold it indefinitely. It will minimise the risk of doctors working outside the scope of registration and continue to protect patients by making sure doctors are appropriately supported and supervised in roles that are within the limits of their registration.

New regulations

These new regulations implement a time limit on the period for which a doctor may hold provisional registration and will come into effect on 1 April 2015. This follows a public consultation on our draft regulations. You can find a report about the consultation on our website (pdf).

How this change affects provisionally registered doctors

Most doctors complete their first year programme training (F1) within 12 months and move to full registration. Therefore, it’s unlikely that the introduction of a maximum allocation of 1125 days will affect those doctors taking part in their F1 training now. If, for whatever, reason a doctor needs more time to complete their training, this new time limit still gives them enough time to repeat their F1 year, if they need to.

To make sure doctors taking part in their F1 training less than full time won’t be unfairly disadvantaged, we’ll be able to allow doctors an additional period of time which won’t count towards their maximum allocation of 1125 days. They will need to meet strict criteria including agreement from their training provider that they can be given more time to complete their training programme.

In January 2015, we’ll write to all provisionally registered doctors to let them know about these new rules and how they could be affected by them.